Incident command organization

Decision-making, planning and tasking activities at the various coordination and command levels that are involved in managing a certain crisis event. 

The organization of the control system in an accident aims to satisfy the most urgent needs and to use precious resources without duplication or waste. The main role of the Command system is to establish planning and management functions for the partners who respond to work in a coordinated and systematic approach.

The aim of the incident command organization should focus, depending on the type of situation, on organizing to sustain safe operations, anticipating avoiding the collapse of the resources, on the coordination for a decision-making process distributed between different actors and on the creation of certainty using strategies of resilience. 
 

Download the table below > Incident command organization

 

     Conceptual compilation of the results collected in 2018 2019 during Fire-in workshops about incident command organization
I. HIGH FLOW OF RESPONDERS IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTII. HIGH IMPACT, LOW FREQUENCY EMERGENCIESIII. MULTI-AGENCY/MULTI-LEADERSHIP ENVIRONMENTIV. HIGH LEVEL OF UNCERTAINTY
ORGANIZE TO SUSTAIN SAFE OPERATIONSANTICIPATE AVOIDING THE COLLAPSE OF RESOURCESCOORDINATE FOR A DECISION MAKING PROCESS DISTRIBUTEDCREATE CERTAINTY THROUGH RESILIENT STRATEGIES

1. Quickly identify and forecast for atime frame.

2. Decision Making (DM) on Tempos:

a) Minimum potential damages

b) Window of opportunity

c) Safety of operations


3. Integral control of resources
 Shifts > Situation awareness


4. Build trust
a) Teambuilding

b) Balance Safety


5. Safety officer

1. Boost:

a) Public information officer

b) Psychological support

c) Analyst


2. DM to avoid collapse:

a) Triage (Method)

b) Alternative probabilistic scenarios where safety protocols will work(Scenario)

c) Availability of responders(Prioritization).

d) Deactivate triggers/chain events(Prioritization).

e) Translate into common objectives and ashared understanding.


3. Integrate feedback from communities


4. Resilience of responders

1. Roles and capabilities

2. DM on objectives:

a) Shared understanding

b) Synchronize simultaneous DM

c) Flexibility and autonomy of DM

to develop objectives

d) Lower DM


3. Structure of coordination:

a) Points of coordination

b) Level of command

c) Information standards

d) Specialists

e) Infrastructure


4. Cultural diversity

1. Resiliency.

2. DM maintaining initiative:

a) Create safe strategic scenarios.

b) Involve communities.

c) Warning systems/self-protection.


3. Reduce uncertainty by reducing:

a) Mission command decision-lag andinfo-toxicity.

b) On field DM, missions.


4. Critical points detection.

5. Credibility

#windowofopportunity #commandpost #timeofarrival #integralcontrolofresources #restwork #extendcommunicationcoverage
#medicalcare #mobilelocation #SafetyOfficer #minimizeexposure

#windowofopportunity #commandpost #timeofarrival #integralcontrolofresources #restwork #extendcommunicationcoverage
#medicalcare #mobilelocation #SafetyOfficer #minimizeexposure

#ICS #EuropeanInteragencyFramework #cross-borderaids #liasonofficer #interoperatibility #eucpm #entrancepoints
#intelligencesharing #entrancepoints #missioncommand
 

#costofopportunity #decisionlag #simultaneity #missioncommand #leadarship #commandsintent #EUWarningSystem
#crowdcontrol #protecthospitals #proactivepolicie
 

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